Science and Technology
The Sky Is the Limit: $7.8 Million Gift to Caltech will Support Aerospace Innovation

Through three gifts to Caltech’s Division of Engineering and Applied Science (EAS), investor and philanthropist Foster Stanback and his wife, Coco, aim to help the Institute advance innovation in space exploration, with the attendant benefits of an educated workforce, skilled jobs, and spinoff technologies. The suite of gifts totals $7.8 million: $3 million to create an endowment for space innovation, $3 million for a fund…

Caltech’s Laser Pioneer Charles H. “Charlie” Townes Dies at 99

Charles H. Townes (Credit: From the Caltech Archives image collection.) Laser pioneer Charles H. “Charlie” Townes (PhD ’39), a life member of the Caltech Board of Trustees and a recipient of the 1964 Nobel Prize…

Huntington Medical Research Institutes Names New President and Chief Scientist

  “I’m greatly honored to have been appointed president of an organization that has such a storied past and such a brilliant future,” said Dr. Marie Csete, new President and Chief Scientist of HMRI. Huntington…

Why Do We Feel Thirst? New Caltech Assistant Professor Examines Vital Human Behavioral Trigger

Credit: Lance Hayashida/Caltech Marketing and Communications To fight dehydration on a hot summer day, you instinctively crave the relief provided by a tall glass of water. But how does your brain sense the need for…

SPIDER Experiment Touches Down in Antarctica

Jeff Filippini, a postdoctoral scholar who worked on the SPIDER receiver team at Caltech, stands in front of the instrument as it was being readied for launch. Credit: Jeff Filippini After spending 16 days suspended…

Wednesday, February 04

Caltech Professor: Bad Decisions Make for Good Ones

Have you made a very bad decision in the past that you have been regretting till now? Then a psychologist says it can be something…

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Asteroid to Fly By Earth Safely

This graphic depicts the passage of asteroid 2004 BL86, which will come no closer than about three times the distance from Earth to the moon on Jan. 26, 2015. Due to its orbit around the sun, the asteroid is currently only visible by astronomers with large telescopes who are located in the southern hemisphere. But by Jan. 26, the space rock's changing position will make it visible to those in the northern hemisphere. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech On January 26, observers will be able to see an asteroid that won’t be around for at least the next 200 years. The asteroid, designated…

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