Science and Technology
Caltech Researchers Build Fastest Camera in the World, Shooting 10 Trillion Frames per Second

The trillion-frame-per-second compressed ultrafast photography system. Image courtesy INRS. Scientists at the Caltech in Pasadena have developed what researchers are calling the fastest camera in the world, capable of frames capturing a “femtosecond,” which is one quadrillionth of a second. Caltech researchers and scientists from the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique in Quebec, Canada created the camera system, called the “T-CUP.” The camera captures…

Officials to Launch Earthquake Alert System Wednesday in Pasadena

Caltech will be the epicenter of a big shake-up in the world of seismology Wednesday as scientists, Congressional leaders and other officials join together to announce the rollout of an earthquake early warning system for…

Pasadena Hackaday Superconference Announces Uniquely Qualified Judges

To say that the four judges coming to Pasadena for next month’s Hackaday Superconference 2018 are unique is an understatement. The Hackaday Superconference is the annual gathering of hardware hackers, engineers and industry experts, who…

Caltech Mom Wins Nobel Prize, Son Is JPL Mars Flight Tech

“What the heck does Mom want? Oh, Mom probably doesn’t understand the time difference, she’s in Dallas right now and is probably still thinking it’s California time…maybe she just wants me to go check on…

Rover Call Home! JPL Engineers Work to Learn Opportunity Rover’s Fate

Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) took the component images for this view from a position outside Endeavor Crater during the span of June 7 to June 19, 2017. Toward the right side of this scene is…

Thursday, October 18

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Scientists Zero in on Landing Spot for Next Mars Rover Landing

Scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena will soon gather for a final workshop to discuss where exactly the next Mars Rover will land…

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Caltech Researchers Trick the Brain with Time-Traveling Illusion

We experience the world through our senses, a constant torrent of sights, sounds, smells, and more. Our brains take these signals and process them, giving rise to our individual perceptions of the world. But sometimes our senses play tricks on us, notably in the case of perceptual illusions. Now, Caltech researchers have developed two new illusions that reveal how the senses can influence each other—in particular, how sound can give rise to visual illusions. These illusions occur so quickly that they illustrate a phenomenon called postdiction (as opposed to prediction) in which a stimulus that occurs later can retroactively affect…

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