Science and Technology
Pasadena Institute Helps Unlock Secret of How Fast the Universe is Expanding

An artist's conception of what's called the cosmic distance ladder -- a series of celestial objects, including type Ia supernovae that have known distances and can be used to calculate the rate at which the universe is expanding. Image courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech An astronomy research institute in Pasadena has come up with improved calibrations that will likely make it easier and faster for scientists to measure…

JPL’s InSight Takes Its First Selfie

This is NASA InSight's first selfie on Mars. It displays the lander's solar panels and deck. On top of the deck are its science instruments, weather sensor booms and UHF antenna. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech The…

JPL-Built Voyager 2 Probe Enters Interstellar Space 11 Billion Miles from Pasadena

This illustration shows the position of NASA's Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 probes, outside of the heliosphere, a protective bubble created by the Sun that extends well past the orbit of Pluto. Voyager 1 exited…

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Tells Us ‘What’s Up’ for December

So begins Jane Houston Jones, Senior Outreach Specialist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, as she presents a preview of what to expect during the month on NASA’s “What’s Up” video show, which has…

Building the Next-Generation Data Networks Needed for High Energy Physics

Illustration of a global network of computers. Credit: Creative Commons/CC0 During a research exhibition at the Supercomputing 2018 Conference (SC18) in Dallas in November, Caltech’s High Energy Physics and network teams—working in collaboration with many…

Saturday, March 16

KPCC, SCPR to Honor Nobel Laureate Dr. Frances H. Arnold at 2019 Gala

  On Saturday, March 16, Southern California Public Radio (SCPR) and KPCC will host its 2019 Gala, honoring Nobel Laureate Dr. Frances H. Arnold. Dr.…

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NASA’s Mars InSight Flexes Its Arm

This image from InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech New images from NASA’s Mars InSight lander show its robotic arm is ready to do some lifting. With a reach of nearly 6 feet (2 meters), the arm will be used to pick up science instruments from the lander’s deck, gently setting them on the Martian surface at Elysium Planitia, the lava plain where InSight touched down on Nov. 26. But first,…

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