Pasadena Heritage Launches 40th Anniversary By Saying Thank You

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From STAFF REPORTS

5:57 pm | July 17, 2017


Pasadena Heritage kicked off its busy 40th Anniversary year with a gathering honoring Heritage associates and major donors Sunday, at the historic Bundy House on South Oakland Avenue in Pasadena.

At the event attended by about 60 people, Pasadena Heritage Board Chair Lucinda Over led other officers of the organization in thanking those who have supported their efforts at preserving many of Pasadena’s historic resources.

“As you know, this organization relies so heavily on the support of its members and major donors to accomplish our work and to accomplish our goals,” Over said. “Today’s event is expressly to thank you Heritage associate members, our business partners and our corporate donors. So thank you all of you for being here.”

Claire Bogaard, Board Member and a past Executive Director of Pasadena Heritage, recalled in her speech some of the significant campaigns the organization has waged in the name of preserving Pasadena’s history, and said she is thankful many are continuing the group’s advocacy.

“It’s hard to believe that there were those times when we had to save all Pasadena from demolition, we had to save the Colorado Street Bridge from demolition,” she recalls. “But now, fortunately, we’re a little bit more in the process, and we do get invited to participate in most of these discussions about where things are going in this city and what ideas and suggestions we have for taking care of our historic resources in the community. Our thanks are to you who are our strong supporters and our enthusiastic supporters who keep us all going.”

Claire Bogaard and her husband, former Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard, were both involved in the founding of Pasadena Heritage. The couple stays active in many community programs; former Mayor Bogaard was just recently named Co-Chair of the newly organized Arroyo Advisory Group, whose objective is to guide both the development, and preservation of the natural features, of the Arroyo Seco.

Renowned Pasadena artist Kenton Nelson, who was at Sunday’s event, unveiled his newest Colorado Street Bridge masterpiece, which he donated to Pasadena Heritage. Sue Mossman, Executive Director of Pasadena Heritage, said the painting will be up for bidding, with the highest bidder able to keep and treasure this painting, knowing the funds are supporting the organization’s work to preserve Pasadena.

The Harlow E. Bundy House where the event was held was designed by Architect T. Beverly Kelm and built in 1913. It is a wonderful example of Pasadena’s Golden Age of architecture. The house illustrates the phenomenon of wealthy tourists coming to Pasadena and finding the city so appealing that they decided to settle here permanently.

The original homeowner, Harlow E. Bundy, made his fortune by inventing the Bundy time clock. After moving to Pasadena, he became involved with the motion picture industry. The grand mansion, now owned by Robert Langton, typifies the Classical Revival style with its massive symmetrical facade featuring Palladian windows, Corinthian columns, and a roof-line balustrade.

The original interior of the house is entirely intact, with a stunning domed Tiffany art glass window in the grand entrance, silk fabric paneling on the walls, herringbone-patterned floors of quarter-sawn white oak with mahogany in-lay, and gilded carvings by a Hungarian church painter.

Outside, visitors saw the tennis court constructed for May Sutton Bundy, one of the first female professional tennis players, along with an original teahouse and pergola.

Earlier, in Pasadena Heritage’s Spring Newsletter, Executive Director Sue Mossman announced the goal this year is to raise $40,000 in donations to support programs and advocacy efforts in 2017 and into the future, calling it the 40th Fund.

Mossman said the campaign is intended to raise money to support the group’s program, including its evaluation of development projects in the City, their education and information drive including speaking at public hearings and helping historic homeowners with questions about their houses, and assisting developers in understanding how to approach their projects.

“Membership dues and funds raised through other programs support these efforts, but there is never enough money to do all we want to do,” Mossman wrote. “If 1,000 people would each donate $40, we would reach our goal. If some will give more, we’ll do better, faster!”

To learn more about Pasadena Heritage and its activities leading to the 40th anniversary, visit www.pasadenaheritage.org.