Members of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media Coalition

Members of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media CoalitionMembers of Congress, Policy Advocates Honored in Washington, D.C. by Pasadena-Based National Hispanic Media Coalition

From STAFF REPORTS

6:47 pm | December 11, 2017


The Pasadena-based National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) honored U.S. Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-California 43rd District), Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada), and Professor of Law Angela Campbell for their contributions to policies that bridge the digital divide and protect the interests of the Latino community and other people of color during its eighth annual NHMC Impact Awards Reception in Washington D.C. late last month.

NHMC President and CEO Alex Nogales said of the honorees, “Now, more than ever, our communities need to be connected online to express themselves freely, access education and health care and continue to move up the economic ladder. What we celebrate is the fact that we have these leaders who will never stop fighting to ensure that we are seen and heard in ways that can open minds and influence change.”

Waters and Cortez Masto were recognized with the NHMC’s Outstanding Public Service Impact Awards, and Campbell was given the Outstanding Advocate Impact Award.

In accepting the award, Waters said she was extremely honored to receive recognition from an organization that has shown outstanding leadership in advocating for greater diversity in the media landscape. “I am so proud of the important work we did during the 2010-2011 Comcast-NBC merger proceedings, and I continue to stand with the NHMC today in the fight to protect a free and open internet for Latinos and other communities of color from the Trump Administration’s efforts to end the net neutrality rules that we diligently fought to achieve,” she said.

Sen. Cortez Masto said Latinos have made incredible strides in the arts, media, and government over the past few decades, but added significant challenges remain. “I look forward to working with the Hispanic Media Coalition in breaking down barriers for our community, protecting the freedom of the press, and in ensuring that our voices and stories are heard,” she said.

Campbell, who is Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Institute for Public Representation at the Georgetown University Law Center, said NHMC’s advocacy at the Federal Communications Commission and the courts have resulted in public interest policies that promote the goals of a diverse and responsive media and affordable, non-discriminatory access to telecommunications services.

“But such policies goals are being undermined by recent FCC actions to allow massive media consolidation and to cut back aid that helps low-income families afford essential services,” Campbell warned. “NHMC’s recognition of advocates will, I hope, inspire more people to fight against such changes and to advocate for a communications policy serving the public rather than corporate interests and providing equal opportunities for Latinos, people of color and women.”

“We honor those individuals who work hard in the telecommunications area,” Nograles said. “It’s a big issue that affects all people, whether they be people of color or just poor people who can’t afford the high prices that (certain) entities would charge for having internet at their house.”

The NHMC gives out recognition awards at least five times a year. In February 2018, the organization will honor artists and those who worked behind the camera and have contributed to the positive image of Latinos.

“We do these events to call attention to the work that is being done regarding entertainment, news, and telecommunications,” Nograles said.

The Washington, D.C. event was supported by the National Association of Broadcasters, as well as Sprint, PBS, Univision and Fusion TV.

The NHMC, which has offices in Pasadena as well as in Washington, is the media watchdog for the Latino community and works to bring decision-makers in the entertainment and news industry to the table to open new opportunities for Latinos to create, contribute and consume programming that is inclusive, free from bias and hate rhetoric, affordable and culturally relevant.

To learn more about the NHMC, visit www.nhmc.org.