Operation Sees Dozens of Pasadena Police Fan Out Citywide, But It Was All Good

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5:35 am | August 8, 2019


Tuesday night was a big night for Pasadena police.

“National Night Out. This is the one time of the year we look forward to!” said Pasadena Chief of Police John Perez, standing in a crowd of local residents mingling with his officers and command staff at Eaton Blanche Park in East Pasadena.

National Night Out is actually a national event that exists to get members of communities engaged with police officers, to get to know each other on a more casual and friendly level.

In Pasadena, the annual event starts with a kick off before police spread out to neighborhood block parties around the City.

“In today’s world with everything going on, people want to be involved, people want to have the desire to want to do something and this is where it starts,” Perez said. “Being connected, being outside, being outside the city, learning more about your police department, your police officers. Getting to know them so you can have casual conversations. And this is what we want.”

The National Night Out program was launched nationally in 1984. is meant to increase awareness about police programs in the community, such as drug prevention campaigns, town and neighborhood watches, and other crime prevention efforts. The first National Night Out involved 2.5 million residents across 400 communities in 23 states.

But engaging with police in a friendly, supportive way doesn’t have to wait for National Night Out each year, said Lt. Sean Dawkins.

“Say hi to us when we’re out there in the community,” he said. “It’s always OK to say hi and talk to us for a few minutes. We want to be community partners.”