Pasadena Honors City’s Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of Duty

Pasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of DutyPasadena Honors Citys Fallen First Responders Who Died in the Line of Duty

6:01 am | May 17, 2019


Pasadena paid homage Thursday morning at the 2019 Pasadena Police and Fire Memorial in the rotunda of City Hall in a solemn and moving tradition.

From the City’s first loss of Officer John Slade in 1909, a total of seven police officers have died in the line of duty. The Pasadena Fire Dept. honored 12.

Pasadena’s memorial was one of many across the country hosted during National Police Week.

Nationwide, 144 federal, state and local law enforcement officers died on the job in 2018 — an increase from the 129 officers who died on duty in 2017, according to The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. The most recent U.S. Fire Administration report shows that 87 American firefighters died while on duty in 2017.

Mayor Terry Tornek, Pasadena Chief of Police John Perez, Fire Chief Bertral Washington spoke. The event included a ceremonial Law Enforcement 21-Gun Salute and Fire Service Ringing of the Bell.

Monet Bagneris performed twice, singing the “Star Spangled Banner” and “God Bless America.” The Pasadena High School Choir also performed two pieces.

“It is a time to reflect, appreciate, and honor those who have sacrificed for their community,” Perez said.

Perez said the memorial serves to help the community to “understand our history, have pride in what we do, and know what our profession stands for in our community.”