Precaution Urged as High Temperatures Forecast in Pasadena Mini Heat Wave

Keep Your Cool While You’re Hot

Published : Friday, July 12, 2019 | 4:52 AM

With a mini heatwave on the horizon yet summer fun at hand, experts say it’s important to take precautions to avoid exhaustion and dehydration.

Temperatures will be in the 90s in Pasadena until at least Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. That means people need to be careful. Following an overcast and relatively chilly spring, high temperatures are kicking in, a product of pressure systems, according to the National Weather Service.

Winds have shifted from West to East, which pushes the cloud layer known often referred to as “June Gloom” out of the way. It’s not exactly a welcome relief from the unusual spring Pasadenans encountered this year with what seemed like a longer than usual coastal marine layer bringing overcast and chilly days.

Prepare to hydrate before exercise.  Ray Castillo in sales at Run With Us in Pasadena, said hydrating two days ahead of time is a good strategy to keep your workouts going in the heat.

“Obviously you’ve got to stay hydrated and drink liquids,” he said. “Water doesn’t cut it, it will carry you a while but it’s preferred to drink anything with electrolytes and low sugar,” he said. “Any good brand of sports drink. But it’s important not to drink just before you run but a few days ahead start staying hydrated.”

It’s suggested to keep your physical activity limited to morning or evening hours when it’s cooler.

But with high temperatures, experts recommend keeping cool in other ways too as higher temperatures can bring a depressed person up to, or over the brink.

John M. Grohol, Psy.D, the author of two books and publisher of the PsychCentral.com website said peoples’ reactions to the weather vary on an individual basis.

Grohol said research done by Denissen et al. (2008) found that weather’s daily influence has more of an impact on a person’s negative mood, rather than helping one’s positive mood.

Higher temperatures were associated with an increase in a person’s negative feelings, feelings such as being more irritable, distressed, or jittery. The researchers also found that greater amounts of sunlight and less amounts of wind decreased these negative feelings.

Grohol quoted research where he indicates a link between human aggression and higher temperatures. (Hsiang et al. 2013). As temperatures rose, the researchers noted that intergroup conflicts also tended to jump by 14 percent (a significant increase). The scientists also found interpersonal violence rose by 4 percent.

The National Weather Service Tips:

• Heat and humidity take a toll on the body

• Know the signs of heat illness

• Reschedule outdoor work and strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day

• Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water

• Heat and humidity take a toll on the body

• Know the signs of heat illness

• Reschedule outdoor work and strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day

• Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water

• Sunburn and heat illness can be avoided

• Apply and reapply sunscreen to protect your skin from sunburn

• NEVER leave children or pets in parked, unattended vehicles

For more information go to:

https://www.weather.gov/media/wrn/presentations/Summer_Safety_Presentation_2019.pdf

blog comments powered by Disqus