The Art of Getting There: Railroad-Inspired Artistry

Artist Bradford J Salamon and his  familyArtist Eric SmithArtist Yoko Mazza next to her  paintingThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired ArtistryThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired ArtistryThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired ArtistryThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired ArtistryThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired ArtistryThe Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired Artistry

From STAFF REPORTS

5:05 pm | May 2, 2017


California is known as one of the car capitals of the world, due, in part, to its infamous traffic. But, long before automobiles reigned supreme, railroads played a major economic and cultural force in driving city life. The Pasadena Museum of History pays tribute to trains of all sorts with the exhibit, The Art of Getting There: Railroad Inspired Artistry, curated by Steve Crise and Michael Patris, of the Mount Lowe Preservation Society.

The exhibit contains over 75 individual artworks, from 36 different artists including photography by Steve Crise, paintings by his wife, Yoko Mazza, and Japanese Woodblock prints on loan from a local collector.

“Curating is a composition that takes place in a room rather than a [camera] viewfinder,” said Criste.

Criste’s work is also featured in the Then/Now books on the Pacific Electric Railway and the photos on display offer different perspectives on the railroads – from the large-scale view, to a microcosm, to the human connection between a father and son. These photos along with the other artworks paint an encompassing picture of the influence railroads have on life.

“There are many different ways to consider rail as art and we hope that visitors will come away with a new perspective,” said Michael Patris, co-curator of the exhibit and founder of the Mount Lowe Preservation Society.

The society focuses on educating the public about the Mount Lowe Railway and its founder-builder and engineer, Thaddeus S. C. Lowe and David J. Macpherson. The Art of Getting There features many items from the society’s archives.

“The artistry of how railroads have been interpreted over the last century is important. [The Art of Getting There] encompasses a broad spectrum from the beginnings of railroads in the 1800s to the Gold Line Extension,” said Steve Criste, co-curator and photographer.

The Art of Getting There is on view through Sunday, August 13 in the Museum’s History Center galleries, 470 W. Walnut St., Pasadena. Admission is $7 General; $6 Students & Seniors; Free for Museum Members and Children under 12. Visit www.pasadenahistory.org for more information.