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All Saints Church Seeking City Permit for Use as Temporary Homeless Shelter

Published on Monday, August 30, 2021 | 5:00 am
 

A city hearing officer will consider a proposal for a conditional use permit (CUP) that would allow All Saints Church to be used as a temporary homeless shelter.

A CUP is required to establish temporary homeless shelter use at a religious facility when participants are residing at the facility for more than 60 days.

The shelter would provide services through the “Safe Haven Bridge to Housing” program. 

Twelve unhoused people working toward permanent housing would be in the program at any one time for four months.

People staying in the shelter would have access to designated sleeping areas from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.

The sleeping area would be located outside under a covered colonnade adjacent to Regas Hall.

“The program would provide a location for participants to sleep, store their belongings, and use toilet/handwashing stations. In addition,” according to a staff report.

Union Station Homeless Services would partner with All Saints Church to provide on-site services, such as community education, case management, and housing navigation services.

Additional services to be provided by Union Station include community education, case management, and housing navigation

According to the 2020 homeless count,  up to 527 people experience homelessness on any given night in Pasadena.

As part of the program at All Saints, participants must agree not to loiter, play loud music, or have disruptive or damaging conduct anywhere on or near the property. 

Furthermore, as part of the commitment to the program, participants would attend weekly meetings with Safe Haven Bridge to Housing program staff within the church’s courtyard area. 

On Dec. 14, the City Council authorized the city manager to enter into a funding contract with Union Station to provide necessary services to facilitate the movement of people experiencing homelessness who are living on the properties of religious institutions into permanent housing. 

All Saints contacted Union Station to seek their support serving the individuals sleeping on the church’s campus. 

Together, the organizations developed the “Safe Bridge to Housing” program. The program provides participants with a safe outdoor sleeping space with access to specialized care coordination, and case management and housing navigation services from a Union Station staff member. The program is designed to move each participant from homelessness to permanent housing. 

City funding for the program is contingent on All Saints obtaining a CUP.

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2 thoughts on “All Saints Church Seeking City Permit for Use as Temporary Homeless Shelter

  • This is a great idea. I see there is a covered area, but not enclosed. How about and enclosed area out of the elements for winter. Perhaps a soup kitchen as well. Offer food like Jesus would to all homeless in the area. This would be a great example for a church that abandoned Christianity long ago for the socialist progressive agenda.

  • Is this a new program? If so how was it conceived as being successful? What do the folks do all day before coming to sleep? Do some have jobs that they go to during the day and they have no other place to sleep? What do they have for these folks at the church for them to bath and have laundry services for changing clothes? Where do they get all of their meals from? Who takes care of their medical needs? Are they all vaccinated from Covid 19? There seems to be a lot of open questions to answer before changing the city into a homeless city waiting for real units to be built in greater number than what has happened over the past 10 years. I’m all for helping people who will help themselves and take the advantages to do so. But I wouldn’t like to see the program as an ongoing program. There needs to be greater conversation with the public on how any program is working. In this city they just seem to last forever.